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Dealing with the aftermath of the Fourth of July?

| Jul 10, 2015 | DUI/Drunk Driving Charges |

Summer holiday weekends, like Memorial Day, the Fourth of July, and summer’s closer, Labor Day are times when many people travel, meet friends and relatives and have parties or other celebrations. From Chattanooga in the east to Memphis in the west, many people in Tennessee rack up the miles heading to the lakes and rivers, mountains or to friend’s homes.

While extended holidays, like the Fourth, allow you to get away from work and relax, often the relaxing may involve alcohol. For some, it may be difficult to know when to stop, and when they attempt to drive, they may attract the attention of the Tennessee Highway Patrol or local law enforcement.

If you were stopped, given a breath test, field sobriety test, or taken in for a blood test and have been arrested and charged with violation of Tennessee’s DUI laws, you may still be somewhat disoriented and confused.

Interacting with law enforcement, especially under the stressful conditions that often accompany a traffic stop on a highway, can be an intense experience. You may never have been in such a position and have no experience with being arrested and booked for a criminal charge.

If this has happened to you, you should speak with an attorney as soon as possible as the consequences that can follow from a DUI conviction are severe and expensive. An attorney can help protect your rights and can work to minimize as much as possible those consequences.

One of the most important things to keep in mind if you are stopped by police is to politely answer all questions by the officer, and to follow their instructions and commands, but never engage in conversation and never say more than necessary to answer a specific question.

If arrested, immediately ask for an attorney and invoke your right to silence. You can never talk your way out of an arrest and are likely to make statements that could compromise your defense.

Source: timesfreepress.com, “Sobriety checkpoints planned for July 4th holiday,” Associated Press, June 30, 2015

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